Streamline Standards Based Progress Reporting: SHAPE America Template + Google Apps

The first thing that went through my mind when I saw the new SHAPE America Standards Based Progress Report Template was “This is awesome.” The second thing that went through my mind is that I have to put this into a Google Doc and create an accompanying Google Sheet so that these can reports be sent to my students and parents as a supplemental report using the Autocrat merge add-on.  The great thing about this template is that it gives P.E. teachers a clean template that is relatively easy to customize.  Whether your school uses Standards Based reporting or not, this template and Google Apps merge system will allow teachers to communicate progress aligned with teacher-selected Grade Level Outcomes.

Here is a video tutorial that will show teachers how to use the Google Doc & Google Sheet to run an Autocrat merge that will create and email the Student Progress Report document.

Here is the SHAPE America Standards Based Student Progress Report created by
Screen Shot 2016-07-18 at 9.03.58 PM

Here is a link to the  Google Drive Folder that includes the Google Doc Template, Google Sheet Template, and some samples.

SHAPE America Grade Level Outcomes PDF

SHAPE America Grade Level Outcomes Crowd Sourced for Google Sheets (ThePhysicalEducator.com)

 

 

Do More with Peer Assessments: Google Forms + Autocrat

Quality Physical Education teachers know that we should be using self and peer assessments to gather evidence of learning during our lessons and units.  We also know that providing timely feedback to our students can be a daunting task given our large class sizes and limited class time.  I used to use paper/pencil peer and self-assessments with my students, but by the time I was able to process the data into something accurate and reliable, the unit was over.  I have solved this problem with GoScreen Shot 2015-11-17 at 9.01.31 AMogle Forms, Google Sheets templates, and Autocrat (add-on script).

 

By setting up a individual “grid” style google form entries, the observer can assess as many (or as few) classmates as prescribed during or after a performance in very short amount time (1-2 minutes).  This data can be processed by the teacher quickly to determine evidence of learning based on central tendencies of the observers (I use mode).  Through the use of autocrat, data is merged with a Google doc template and feedback is customized and sent directly to students (via email, or print to distribute).  This can all be done for hundreds of students within 15-20 minutes.  Here’s how:

 

The PHYSEDagogy Podcast – #Physed Showcase – Edition #3

PHYSEDAGOGY

 Current Episode:

Edition #3 Cover PhotoThe PHYSEDagogy Podcast – #Physed Showcase Edition #3

Here is the third edition of the #Physed Showcase Podcast.  In this episode we will wrap up the #PhysedSummit 2.0.   You will hear Adam Metcalf talk about how to create a sustainable system for sport education units.  Learn about the Burp It On program and hear them talk about how they are raising awareness for physical activity. Listen to Matt Guth and Jonathan Jones talk about how they have got their students connected through a Pen Pal Program. 

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What I Saw & What I Learned: An American P.E. Teacher’s trip to Melbourne, Australia & Singapore (Blog 3 of 3)

This is the third of three blog posts in my attempt to summarize and piece together some of the major takeaways from my professional development trip to Melbourne, Australia and Singapore. This trip was conceived and designed with the help of my personal learning network (PLN) from the #PhysEd and #PEgeeks community on Twitter. During this trip, I spent a school day with each teacher as they conducted physical education classes as well as any other additional duties throughout the course of the day.

At its core, this trip allowed me to experience the type of learning I hope my students strive to obtain. What better way to model experiential learning than to pack my bags, get on a plane, and fly half way around the world to visit people I’ve never met in places I’ve never been: all while thinking, I really hope I planned this right!

Day 8: Monday March 31, 2014
Teacher: Mike Gilmour (Twitter @Gilmour_Mike)
Overseas Family School (Singapore)
http://www.ofs.edu.sg/

The streets of Singapore are lined with enormous shopping centers, multiplexes, and skyscrapers. New construction and renovations are ongoing in nearly every part of the city. Public transportation systems (trains, cabs, and buses and buses) are exceptionally affordable and easy to use. My first full day in Singapore begins with a 10-minute cab ride to Overseas Family School to visit Mike Gilmour. Having arrived a bit early, I take advantage of my free time to walk around the surrounding neighborhood as well as observe the morning traffic.

What I Saw:
The school buses arriving at OFS would be what Americans would call charter buses. Buses and cars entered the manned security gates while traffic was directed by a large number of yellow vested individuals to help coordinate the morning drop off.
Overseas Family School is a for-profit IMG_1980K-12 International Baccalaureate Curriculum (Primary Years, Middle Years and Diploma programs: enrollment is approximately 3600 students from 73 countries).

Mike Gilmour (Primary Physical Education) and his wife (2nd grade) have been teachers at OFS for 4.5 years. Mike is originally from South Africa and absolutely loves the international school circuit. The facilities and logistics of all of Physical Education were fascinating to see in action. With only outdoor facilities, I was able to witness 6+ P.E. classes (of various grades and areas of campus) going on at the same time. I was astounded at the level of focus and maturity of the students, who were able to follow instructions and remain engaged in a myriad of activities while numerous potential distractions were so close (noise from other classes, construction equipment, etc.).

Mike’s personality and teaching style makes for a very exciting learning environment. During his grade 4 adventure education lessons, his instructions were clear and concise:
IMG_2009students transitioned quickly through 4-5 team challenges with very little down time. With the consistently hot and humid weather (95 F, 35 C), the students took frequent water breaks throughout the course of the hour-long P.E. class.

In addition to seeing many adventure challenge activities, I was also able to see how the P.E. teachers implemented their first Sport Education (SEPEP) unit through the Swiss sport of tchoukball. Teams were lead by student-player/coaches through a round robin regular season. The teams that won their respective class seasons competed in the “Exhibition” games during lunch/recess (where hundreds of students could watch as they ate lunch in and near the canteen).

What I Learned:
I had never had much exposure to International Schools and had many questions about how the various schools were funded, teacher contracts, student contracts, etc. Mike and his teaching colleagues were extremely helpful in explaining how the various types of international school systems operate (for profit, nonprofit, etc.). As far as what I’ve gained as a teacher, I could not have been more impressed with Mike Gilmour (as well as his teaching colleagues). The best way to truly get an appreciation for how tal
IMG_2012ented and passionate certain people are is to see them in their element. I was absolutely blown away by the efficiency with which Mike was able to deliver immensely dynamic lessons in a variety of settings. I have a new appreciation for what students can handle when the teachers plan units and lessons to maximize content and activity within all available spaces.

Day 9: Tuesday April 1, 2014
Teachers: Josh Symes (Twitter @JSymes77) & Anne Wenstrom (Twitter @AWenstrom)
Singapore American School (Singapore)
http://www.sas.edu.sg/

A 30-minute cab ride out to Woodlands (suburban setting) to Singapore American School to spend the day with Josh Symes (Australia) and Anne Wentrome (Minnesota, U.S.A.). The
transition from city to suburb was definitely a shift in the amount of space available. TheSAS courts campus of Singapore American School is progressive, beautiful, and vast. A student- SAS cricketcentered design is extremely apparent with the amount of integrated outdoor social courtyards,
open-air walkways, and areas available for play. This nonprofit international school is built to support up to 3900 students with a college campus type feel with primary, intermediate, middle, and high schools.

 

What I Saw:
I spent the first part of the morning with middle school Physical Education teacher, Josh Symes (friend of Andy Hair who I had visited in Geelong, Australia the week IMG_2025prior). Josh’s inquiry-based teaching approach is the perfect fit for the P.E. department philosophy of exposure to sport. As part of the core curriculum, P.E. classes meet for either 70 or 90 minutes every other day! Throughout the course of the school year, 18 different sport units are covered within 3-day allotments. I witnessed a “day 2” volleyball lesson where students were recording and viewing video of setting and forearm passing through the use of iPads (Bam Video IMG_2030Delay and Coach’s Eye apps). Small groups worked productively to perform practice tasks and reflect upon improvements that they could make based on what they just observed. Josh was able to visit the groups and provide additional feedback to the students.

As a teacher, Josh is extremely reflective and well read. His laid back demeanor (teacher/learner equality) could be misinterpreted by a “traditional” (direct instruction style) teacher as aloof. Through an afternoon and evening of conversation, it was apparent that his teaching approach is exceptionally calculated. Allowing students to experiment and discover the best way to approach sport skills and strategies provides a
IMG_2061richer, more meaningful transfer of knowledge. Josh explained how his entire middle school P.E. department (9 teachers) has or is transitioning to more student centered. The basic model is to have the student start each sport with a personal goal, then explore how to reach it. The traditional focus on skill (grip, positioning of feet, hands, etc.) is thrown out the window, students learn by doing.

I spent the late morning through the midafternoon with Apple Distinguished primary (K-2) P.E. teacher, Anne Wenstrome. The primary P.E. area(s) of the school was a technology dream come true. Cart-mounted flat screen TVs (equipped with AppleTVs and Microsoft Kinect consoles) and iPads were plentiful.
IMG_2038The gym for Anne’s classes was set up into floor hockey game and skill stations to maximize student activity.   Two stations incorporated gameplay tasks, one station allowed for partner passing, and one station was dedicated to visual feedback. A tripod-mounted iPad on Bam Video Delay allowed students to practice, then view their own grip and shot execution. After a few attempts each student would then reflect on his/her skill development by filling out and submitting a Google Form (which included images of correct hand position/follow through to reference).

What I Learned:
Witnessing Josh’s inquiry-based teaching style and Anne’s organization and creativity was a delight to see in person. Seeing how both teachers were able to
IMG_2053purposefully integrate technology for student-directed feedback produced a stream of ideas for ways in which I could replicate these routines into my own classes.

 

 

 

Day 10: Wednesday April 2, 2014
Teacher: Nathan Horne (Twitter @PENathan)
ISS International School (Singapore)
http://www.iss.edu.sg/

My final school visit began with a 10-minute cab ride to ISS International School to visit Nathan Horne (Tasmania, Australia). Meeting Nathan Horne was one of the primary IMG_2072 objectives of my trip to Singapore. Having followed his work on Twitter and the #PhysEd Podcast for over a year, I treasured the opportunity to see him teach and have professional conversations about best practices in Physical Education.

ISS is a for-profit International Baccalaureate Primary Years Program (IB PYP) that has students from over 50 nationalities. The aims of PYP schools are to connect the curriculum content to a series of desired attributes and attitudes that characterize successful students (Inquirers, Thinkers, Communicators, Risk-takers, Knowledgeable, Principled, Caring, Open-minded, Well-balanced, Reflective).

What I Saw:
Nathan’s P.E. classes were beginning of a 6-week swimming unit where each class was bussed to the public pool. Normal P.E. classes are scheduled twice per week for 45 IMG_2075minutes, however, during the swimming unit, scheduling is adjusted to allow for one 90
minute session per week (due to the 10-minute bus ride at the beginning and end of class). P.E. teachers and swim coaches work with groups of 5-7 students at a time to progress through various levels of swimming challenges and tasks. Younger students focus on introductory swim concepts (breathing, kicks, arm strokes), while the more experienced students (up to grade 5) worked on advanced techniques in the 50M lap pool. Nathan’s inquiry-based teaching style helps the students discover how to improve their level of comfort in the water. Throughout the course of the swim unit, student motivation to IMG_2088improve upon personal goals of lap-time in the various swim strokes was to culminate in the all-school swim carnival.

The technology integration at ISS is remarkable (Apple Macbooks, iPads, and Google Apps for Education). Nathan shared several examples of student projects, digital portfolios, and even K-2 students video explanations of their work (much more efficient that having the students type). Nathan and I spent a good portion of the afternoon discussing sharing the various types of workflow data collection systems that we use. I was especially impressed with his use of Google forms to track behavior and skill development (“Ages & Stages” motor development by age). We talked at length about successes and challenges we’ve had in Sport Education and Teaching Games for Understanding instructional models.

We continued our conversation throughout the course of the evening as we went out for dinner and were joined by Mike Gilmour. The three of us spoke about how powerful
IMG_2095collaborating with like-minded educators on Twitter can be. It was incredibly refreshing to discuss and welcome different perspectives in order to further enrich our own teaching practice.

What I Learned:
There are certain moments in life that feel profoundly different, and the day I spent with Nathan certainly one of them. Meeting and establishing a friendship with Nathan is the start of what I believe will be something special for years to come. Having the conversations (both personal and professional) throughout the day and evening with Nathan have me feeling truly inspired to do more and share more of all of the good we are doing as educators.

I had an extremely rare opportunity (provided by The Avery Coonley School’s Lucia Burton Morse Grant) to build real professional relationships with some of the most reflective and progressive teachers on the other side of the world. I feel an enormous obligation to take what I’ve learned from this experience, and figure out how I can pay it forward. I am eager to share my newly shaped perspectives to improve my own teaching as well as inspire other teachers to step outside of their comfort zone, think big, and never stop learning.

What I Saw & What I Learned: An American P.E. Teacher’s trip to Melbourne, Australia & Singapore (Blog 2 of 3)

This is the second of three blog posts in my attempt to summarize and piece together some of the major takeaways from my professional development trip to Melbourne, Australia and Singapore.  This trip was conceived and designed with the help of my personal learning network (PLN) from the #PhysEd and #PEgeeks community on Twitter.  During this trip, I spent a school day with each teacher as they conducted physical education classes as well as any other additional duties throughout the course of the day.

At its core, this trip allowed me to experience the type of learning I hope my students strive to obtain.  What better way to model experiential learning than to pack my bags, get on a plane, and fly half way around the world to visit people I’ve never met in places I’ve never been: all while thinking, I really hope I planned this right!

Day 4: Thursday March 27, 2014
Teacher: Andy Hair (Twitter @MrHairPhysEd)
Leopold Primary School (Leopold, Victoria)
http://www.leopold.vic.edu.au/

IMG_1796I checked out of my accommodations in Melbourne and walked with my luggage in a light rain to Southern Cross station (1000m).  Hopped aboard V-Line train to
Geelong (a little over an hour ride) where a smiling Andy Hair picked me up.  Andy was wearing my school’s T-shirt (which we swapped last school year through the #PEshirtswap) and his knees and ankles were wrapped in ace bandages as he was still recovering from the Ironman competition from the past weekend.  Having skyped with Andy on two occasions, it was fantastic to meet him in person.  We spoke as if we were old friends as he took me on a brief drive from the train station to his school.

What I Saw:
Leopold Primary School is an extremely charming Prep-Grade 6 public school about 15 minutes outside of the historic port city of Geelong, Victoria.  The gym is absolutely IMG_1748gorgeous!  I was especially fond of the wood floors and the garage-style doors, which were kept open throughout the school day to allow fresh air to flow through.  The gym is owned by the local parks and recreation service and is used in the evenings for clubs, sport leagues, taekwondo, dance, etc.  The outdoor facilities include playgrounds, basketball/downball courts (similar to “4 square” played with a tennis ball), a footy oval (field), and a large soccer field.

Andy is the head of a two-person Physical Education department (with Gemmah Gill).  The two teachers share and office just outside the gym and often team teach together.  Andy begins each school day wheeling his robust technology cart into the gym (complete with iPads, projector, AppleTV, and speakers).  Near the back wall of the stage hangs an enormous projector screen that Andy helped to build.

Grades 5 & 6 P.E. classes for the day consisted of a guest instructor from Lacrosse Victoria, a company that conducts clinics at schools and park districts throughout the IMG_1760area.  Students hadn’t seen Andy since the week before the Ironman, so they were extremely excited to see and hear about his experience.  It was evident that his students had a genuine affinity for Andy, whose upbeat demeanor and aura of respect is infectious.  Andy spoke colorfully about his experience in the Ironman to his students as jaws hung open with the details of how excruciating the eleven-hour event was on his body and mind.  Andy’s personification of a healthy lifestyle, along with his family balance, is inspiring for both students and his colleagues.

Both P.E. teachers are comfortable and efficient with technology.  I was extremely impressed by one of Andy’s Excel spreadsheets that is used when entering student sport data.  The spreadsheet was created with auto-calculating/VLookup functions to sort by age and student scores automatically by the simple entry of each student’s assigned IMG_1761number.  This type of data entry tool is great for students in that they can quickly find out how they scored within their age group (without having the teachers spending several hours entering names and scores).

Technology is also incorporated throughout the school with the integration of Google Apps for Education.  Student technology emersion is evident through the use iPads and laptops (1-to-1 from grades 4-6). The school just implemented a learning management system, called School Turf, which is run by two men who customize the LMS as needed for the teaching/administrative staff.  Formative feedback, grading, digital portfolios and digital documents are seamlessly shared between the teachers and students.   School Turf also includes a “learning network” (similar to a social network) where student can blog, leave comments, and “like” certain posts.

What I Learned:
As a teacher in the field of Physical Education, I could not have been more impressed with how Andy Hair personifies IMG_1770everything that is right about our profession.  He practices what he preaches with such humility that it is no surprise that his students and his colleagues respect him so genuinely.  Andy is the type of teacher (and the type of person) that students are inspired by and aspire to be like.


Day 5: Friday March 28, 2014
Teacher: Ashley Mills (Twitter @AshleaMills)
Firbank Grammar School (Brighton, Victoria)
http://www.firbank.vic.edu.au/

After spending the night in a rental apartment in Geelong, I walked with my luggage about a half mile to the V-Line train station to take a 7am train from Geelong towards Southern Cross Station.  I transferred at the Footscray stop to Werribee line towards Flinders St. Station.  Then transferred at Flinders St. Station to the Sandringham Line to North Brighton.  I then walked about a half mile to Firbank Grammar School where I met Ashlea Mills.

What I Saw:
Firbank Grammar is an elite, all girls, private PYP school (Primary Years Programme).  Themes of inquiry provide a scope and sequence for which all subjects and content areas use to guide units and instruction.  Enrollment is around 310 with class sizes of approximately 23.  Ashlea Mills is the main PE teacher for Years 2-6 and is accompanied by 2 part time PMP teachers (Perceptual Motor Programme movement/skills in stations).

Physical Education classes begin in the sport room which has a mounted TV (with a protective enclosure) where Ashlea displays visual aids though AppleTV.  The sport room IMG_1819has a glass wall with sliding door that opens to the outdoor facilities, which include several tennis courts, netball/basketball courts, playgrounds, and a large oval (grass field).  Ashlea was teaching her final lesson of her cross-country unit to her grade 4 students.  Students bring their own Ipad to class (purchased by the family, required by school).

IMG_1828

Ashlea’s lessons for the day were based on collecting each girl’s 12-minute run data through the use of an app called Run Lap Tap.  Students were partnered up where one girl would run around the 200 meter track (which had been painted by maintenance staff) while the other would start the timer
and double-tap each time a IMG_1837lap was completed. Upon completing the run, results were emailed to Ashlea as well as the runner.  Information included how many laps were completed and how long each lap took (which allowed for speed: meters/second).

Ashlea is an incredibly efficient teacher in both her planning and her instruction time.  She seamlessly multitasks and transitions from student meetings to classes throughout the day.  Efficiency is crucial for Ashlea, as she organizes team sport as well as adventure camps throughout the school year.  Although Ashlea has only been a teacher for 3 years, she is an extremely proficient and reflective teacher.  She stays informed about best teaching practices by attending (and presenting) at Teach Meet sessions, is active in the #PhysEd Twitter community, reads educational blogs, and writes her own blog (www.healthybodies-happyminds.com)

The school day concluded (as does every Friday) with an all school assembly lead by the Year 6 students (each week, a different year presents).  The school demonstrates the importance of community through the presentation of awards, poetry, musical performances, and other various recognitions.

What I Learned:
It was extremely beneficial for me to see how the themes of inquiry function in a primary school.  The mission and values of the school (learning, initiative, endeavor, achievement, responsibility, integrity, respect, creativity, spirituality, flexibility, diversity) are integrated
applied throughout all of the content areas.  It was eye opening for me to see how this type of curriculum worked, not only in a P.E. setting, IMG_1849but throughout the various classroom environments as well.  Ashlea’s relationships with her students, as well as her time management techniques, were incredible to witness (for teachers of any age or content area).  Her purposeful and efficient integration of iPad applications in P.E. was exciting to see, and has me inspired to find ways to bring some of her ideas to my school.